CBT
for
Trauma

Life can, sometimes, throw shocking events our way. If an event involves a person being exposed to actual or threatened death, serious injury, physical, emotional, or sexual violence, then such an event is regarded by clinical psychologists as a traumatic event, or ‘trauma’. Experiences like these may involve a single traumatic event, or they may be repeated and/or prolonged traumatic experiences.

CBT
for
Trauma

Life can, sometimes, throw shocking events our way. If an event involves a person being exposed to actual or threatened death, serious injury, physical, emotional, or sexual violence, then such an event is regarded by clinical psychologists as a traumatic event, or ‘trauma’. Experiences like these may involve a single traumatic event, or they may be repeated and/or prolonged traumatic experiences.

Symptoms of traumatic experiences

Many people who have been exposed to traumatic events manage to cope reasonably well with them, and eventually ‘get over’ them. This is more so the case with ‘once off’, single traumatic events (such as a serious traffic accident, physical or sexual assault, the sudden death of a loved one, distressing medical intervention, some natural disaster, as well as ‘near misses’ of all such events).

On the other hand, people who have suffered repeated and prolonged traumatic experiences,  as is the case with emotional and/or physical, and/or sexual abuse, are less likely to simply ‘get over’ these damaging experiences, and recover fully, without proper treatment.However, even a single traumatic event can result in a person developing distressing symptoms that are clearly related to their traumatic experience. 

Often this involves one or more of the following: recurrent distressing memories of the traumatic event(s); recurrent distressing dreams (nightmares) that are related to the traumatic event(s); feeling or acting as if the traumatic event is ‘happening all over again’ (so-called ‘flashbacks’); avoidance of persons, objects or situations that are associated with the traumatic event(s); heightened arousal (in the form irritable behaviour and angry outbursts, being constantly ‘on the look-out’ for possible danger or threat, being easily startled, poor concentration and disturbed sleep).

This pattern of symptoms is known as a ‘posttraumatic stress disorder’ (PTSD). In addition, symptoms of other mental health problems, notably of anxiety and depression, may also develop, in the aftermath of trauma. 

People that have been exposed to heavy traumatic expierence often are less likely to get over it

Symptoms of traumatic experiences

Many people who have been exposed to traumatic events manage to cope reasonably well with them, and eventually ‘get over’ them. This is more so the case with ‘once off’, single traumatic events (such as a serious traffic accident, physical or sexual assault, the sudden death of a loved one, distressing medical intervention, some natural disaster, as well as ‘near misses’ of all such events).

On the other hand, people who have suffered repeated and prolonged traumatic experiences,  as is the case with emotional and/or physical, and/or sexual abuse, are less likely to simply ‘get over’ these damaging experiences, and recover fully, without proper treatment.However, even a single traumatic event can result in a person developing distressing symptoms that are clearly related to their traumatic experience. 

Often this involves one or more of the following: recurrent distressing memories of the traumatic event(s); recurrent distressing dreams (nightmares) that are related to the traumatic event(s); feeling or acting as if the traumatic event is ‘happening all over again’ (so-called ‘flashbacks’); avoidance of persons, objects or situations that are associated with the traumatic event(s); heightened arousal (in the form irritable behaviour and angry outbursts, being constantly ‘on the look-out’ for possible danger or threat, being easily startled, poor concentration and disturbed sleep).

This pattern of symptoms is known as a ‘posttraumatic stress disorder’ (PTSD). In addition, symptoms of other mental health problems, notably of anxiety and depression, may also develop, in the aftermath of trauma. 

People that have been exposed to heavy traumatic expierence often are less likely to get over it

Breaking the vicious circle

cognitive behavioral therapy for trauma

Can PsychOnline4u help you recover from a traumatic experience? Yes, in many cases we can. In recent decades, several methods, based on CBT, have been developed to treat the symptoms of PTSD, and of traumatic experiences in general. One of these is known as Prolonged Exposure Therpy, abbreviated as PET.

Another, often highly effective treatment for trauma is a method known as Eye Movement- Desensitization and Reprocessing, abbreviated as EMDR. PsychOnline4u can offer both PET and EMDR to help people recover from a traumatic experience and reclaim their mental health.

And, we do so online, in live treatment sessions with an experienced psychologist, who has been trained in CBT, EMDR, and PET. In other words, you can do your trauma therapy in the privacy of your own home, with all the practical advantages that has to offer!

cognitive behavioral therapy for trauma

Breaking the vicious circle

cognitive behavioral therapy for trauma

Can PsychOnline4u help you recover from a traumatic experience? Yes, in many cases we can. In recent decades, several methods, based on CBT, have been developed to treat the symptoms of PTSD, and of traumatic experiences in general. One of these is known as Prolonged Exposure Therpy, abbreviated as PET.

Another, often highly effective treatment for trauma is a method known as Eye Movement- Desensitization and Reprocessing, abbreviated as EMDR. PsychOnline4u can offer both PET and EMDR to help people recover from a traumatic experience and reclaim their mental health.

And, we do so online, in live treatment sessions with an experienced psychologist, who has been trained in CBT, EMDR, and PET. In other words, you can do your trauma therapy in the privacy of your own home, with all the practical advantages that has to offer!

cognitive behavioral therapy for trauma

Overcome trauma

To learn more about trauma, and about how PsychOnline4u uses online guided CBT to help people break the vicious circle of their trauma, so that they can bounce back to mental health, you can request our free e-book ‘Overcome Trauma’. 

E-book Overcome Trauma

Break the vicious circle of trauma

Overcome trauma

To learn more about trauma, and about how PsychOnline4u uses online guided CBT to help people break the vicious circle of their trauma, so that they can bounce back to mental health, you can request our free e-book ‘Overcome Trauma’. 

E-book Overcome Trauma

Break the vicious circle of trauma

If you are wondering whether our online support, using either PET or EMDR, might be a suitable approach for your particular problems of trauma, you can request a (once-off) free online consultation (by voice or video, whichever you prefer) to discuss this, as well as any other specific queries you may have. Once again, you can do so by using either the contact form, or the email address, on the website.

TIP: But, before you request our free consultation, we think it would probably be handy if you first read the information in our free e-book ‘CBT for Trauma. That way, you can make your queries more specific.

Finally: the scope of guided CBT for reducing mental health problems such as the symptoms of mild to moderate anxiety disorders, depression, or trauma, is obvious. Research has shown that self-help resources, based on CBT, can be effective in tackling these problems, and even more so when these resources are combined with support from a professional trained in CBT.

However, some people struggle with severe levels of these psychological problems. In those cases, guided CBT will not be adequate in addressing their mental health needs. More intensive forms of treatment will usually be required, of the kind provided in regular face-to-face therapy!

That’s why we, at PsychOnline4ufirst do an initial assessment: to identify both the nature and severity of a person’s mental health problem,  so that we can decide whether our guided CBT would be sufficient, or whether more intensive treatment is required. If our assessment indicates that the latter is indeed the case, then we will discuss this with the person in question, and advise them to seek more intensive treatment.

And we will do this, as much as possible, in close cooperation with their GP. This is explained in more detail on the website, in the information about Assessment, and also in our Terms and Conditions.

If you are wondering whether our online support, using either PET or EMDR, might be a suitable approach for your particular problems of trauma, you can request a (once-off) free 15 minute online consultation (by voice or video, whichever you prefer) to discuss this, as well as any other specific queries you may have. Once again, you can do so by using either the contact form, or the email address, on the website.

TIP: But, before you request our free 15 minute consultation, we think it would probably be handy if you first read the information in our free e-book ‘CBT for Trauma. That way, you can make your queries more specific.

Finally: the scope of guided CBT for reducing mental health problems such as the symptoms of mild to moderate anxiety disorders, depression, or trauma, is obvious. Research has shown that self-help resources, based on CBT, can be effective in tackling these problems, and even more so when these resources are combined with support from a professional trained in CBT.

However, some people struggle with severe levels of these psychological problems. In those cases, guided CBT will not be adequate in addressing their mental health needs. More intensive forms of treatment will usually be required, of the kind provided in regular face-to-face therapy!

That’s why we, at PsychOnline4ufirst do an initial assessment: to identify both the nature and severity of a person’s mental health problem,  so that we can decide whether our guided CBT would be sufficient, or whether more intensive treatment is required. If our assessment indicates that the latter is indeed the case, then we will discuss this with the person in question, and advise them to seek more intensive treatment.

And we will do this, as much as possible, in close cooperation with their GP. This is explained in more detail on the website, in the information about Assessment, and also in our Terms and Conditions.